Ginger—The Amazing Superfood You Should be Eating

Ginger—The Amazing Superfood You Should be Eating

Not only is this gnarled root delicious as a flavor addition, it’s also loaded with nutrients and compounds that can do some extraordinary things for your health. Read on to learn how this food works overtime for you!

From the outside, ginger doesn’t look like much—just your typical root vegetable, pale yellow to brown in color and with a pungent, spicy odor that hits your nose the moment it’s cut into.  Dating back to ancient China, it has been used for thousands of years as both a spice and a natural medicinal. However, recent scientific studies have discovered the reasons why it is so healthy to consume.

The primary bioactive compound that makes ginger so unique is gingerol.  Gingerol is an oil, and is known for its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant abilities. Muscle soreness and pain are just two of the conditions that are eased by ginger, particularly with use after exercise. Its anti-inflammatory properties can also help those that suffer from arthritis, too. One study found that those patients with osteoarthritis who consumed ginger reported a significant reduction in pain, even to the point of taking less pain medication.

Its pain reducing capabilities are not just for musculoskeletal conditions either—ginger is also known

Should Women Be Getting Mammograms at 30?

Should Women Be Getting Mammograms at 30?

Women are typically recommended to start getting mammograms at age 45, but some new research suggests that this recommendation may not be for everyone. The current recommendation is for women 45 and older to get a mammogram every year, and women age 55 and older to get one every other year.

However, according to a new study, some women should get mammograms started as early as age 30. A new study presented at the Radiological Society of North America suggests that yearly mammograms for women starting at age 30 are beneficial for women in a select group: women who have particularly dense breast tissue and women who have a personal or family history of developing breast cancer. This study used data from 5 million mammograms on 2.6 million women between the years 2008 and 2019.

Although the standard recommendation is for women to begin receiving mammograms at age 45, some organizations are beginning to recommend that they start earlier, even for women without a personal or family history of breast cancer.

While the American Cancer Society uses the standard age 45 recommendation, others such as the Radiological Society of North America have begun recommending annual mammograms at age 40, and the aforementioned mammograms

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